Jules Guérin

"So glad to receive your joyous news about the 'Cubs.'"

--Jules Guérin to Edward H. Bennett, 09/10/1908

Jules Guérin (November 18, 1866 – June 14, 1946) was an American artist. He illustrated for Daniel Burnham on the McMillan plan for Washington D.C. and was later made a staff artist on the Burnham and Bennett's Plan of Chicago. The letters displayed below are from Lake Forest College's Edward H. Bennett collection. They range in date from 1908, when Guérin had completed his work on the Plan, to 1912, when Bennett asked him to serve as Director of Color for the Panama Pacific International Exposition.

  

Sketch by Jules Guérin

 

 

Jules Guérin to Edward H. Bennett Correspondence, 06/29/1908

June 29 1908

Dear Bennett:

A line to say that I sail for Chicago tomorrow, Tuesday, June 30 via Lake Shore Limited. Shall come immediately to the office on my arrival, if you have nothing better to do, I shall be charmed to have you to dinner with me.

A bientot

Sincerely

Jules Guérin

 

Jules Guérin to Edward H. Bennett Correspondence, 09/07/1908

Sept. 7, 1908

Dear Edward:

Arrived here Sat. evening and I feel much better than when my last letter was written. Enjoyed a bully plunge in the surf this morning, and am really getting on my legs again. Beautiful days, and warm: Buzzards Bay is entirely too cold for me. This place is about [unknown] from N. Y. and as sea-side places go, interesting. Ashbury Park is only two towns up its coast. [Unknown] goes there. Will write again when more time presents itself. The Madam is waiting to go for a walk. The enclosed bill I trust will meet with your approval. I miss you and Andy very much and I hope I may be with you again before many months. With all kinds of good wishes to you.

Sincerely

Jules Guérin

 

Jules Guérin to Edward H. Bennett Correspondence, 09/10/1908

New York. Sept. 10. 1908

My Dear Edward:

Very glad to have your letter of Sept. 7. arrived today on my return to New York from the Jersey Shore.  I stayed there as long as my nerves would allow, and enjoyed a few salt baths. But I found the call of the town was too much. My vacations are generally very brief. And again, all the hotels are closing, or closed, for the season, so I fear if you should design to come on now, you would find scant fare anywhere: everything this [unknown] to finish between Sept. 1 and 15th. But New York is good: why not come down and see how the old [unknown] looks. You really should do it. If you do come, I hope you will stay at the same hotel were Mrs. Guérin and I stay. The Hotel Brevoort, on 5th Ave. and 8th St. Very fine old French character, and really the best place in the city to dine. Let me know in advance that I may engage a room for you, if you decide to come. Regarding the sketches to be signed: send them here at the Players, and I will be very glad to sign and return them to you quite immediately. Was very glad to know Mr. Burnham is resting comfortable, and alas to [unknown] his phrase for my humble efforts on behalf of the plan: it is always, to me at least, a great satisfaction, to know that efforts are appreciated. Am sure you and Andy enjoyed your trip to Geneva: you write in most glowing terms: only you [unknown] have remained long enough to do some good. Kindly extend my compliments to everyone, and many good wishes to you and do not forget Junkin if he is returned.

Sincerely,

Jules Guérin

P.S. So glad to receive your joyous news about the “Cubs.”

 

Jules Guérin to Edward H. Bennett Correspondence, 09/15/1908

New York. Sept. 15. 1908

Dear Edward:

Have just unpacked my trunk, and I notice in my [unknown] trunk that my cuffs have dis-appeared. Think I must have left them in the bureau drawer at the Union Club. There were perhaps a dozen pair white and colored: would you mind asking the house-keeper if she has seen them. They were all together in the right hand small bureau drawer. The Grand Rapids Renaissance nearest the door. Another thing: I neglected to give Henry a tip on my departure: I [unknown] shy of it, and then decided if I did so, some rule of the club would be broken. It is not permitted at the Players, but if it is quite the thing to do in Henry’s case, I should like to give it my attention. Everybody has returned to town, and the Players is as busy as the “Cubs” and “Socks” put together. We only need one more to make complete happiness: Edward Bennett as a guest: when will that do. Hope you are feeling in the best condition. My greetings to all the boys, and all kinds of good wishes to you, mon cher maître.

Sincerely,

Jules Guérin

 

Jules Guérin to Edward H. Bennett Correspondence, 10/07/1908

Dear Edward:

A few lines to say we sail Sat. next. N. G. Lloyd “[unknown].” [Unknown] stop will be Tangier. There to Venice. Address—[unknown], Venice, and it will be forwarded. Please say good bye to Andy and Mr. Burnham, and in fact to all the good boys in your office. Write a line and I will answer. I hope the color proofs are coming out all right. Save a copy of the report for me, please. Good luck, old man, and much success and happiness to you.

Sincerely,

Jules Guérin

 

Jules Guérin to Edward H. Bennett Correspondence, 01/24/1909

Siena. Jan. 24-1909

My Dear Edward:

Was delighted to have your letter of Jan & enclosing clipping, and I can picture in my mind the “Grand Chanette,” the only thing I regret is that I could not have been there and in it with you. I hope you will let me know from time to time how [unknown] progress with the plan, and how I would like to [unknown] the new drawings of Grant Park and the civic center. But this will be in store for me when next in Chicago. Yes, the earthquake is certainly bad, and its effects are very discouraging- we hear [unknown] and [unknown] and dreadful stories on all sides. I received a letter with Mr. Burnham’s Paris address, and sent, the same day, the proof of Grant Park: he has it by now, no doubt. It is mighty cold here, and I have contracted one of those very severe colds of the lungs, which it seems almost impossible to shake off. It [unknown], and the [unknown] was achieved by spending two hours in the “Belle Arti” here in Siena: after that I went to bed. Nothing serious, you know, but I shall leave earlier than anticipated, and on Feb. 5 shall sail from Naples to Alexandria. There direct to Cairo. (Address to Shepherds Hotel). And for business reasons, kindly do not I am in Egypt should any one ask: say I am still in Siena, and all communications will be forwarded. We have had two shocks here within the month of Jan: not severe, but enough to make one sit up and take notice. They are generally more severe in [unknown] in summer than winter. Should be, I expect in Cairo about one month, and am looking forward to the so-journ, as I enjoy the place very much and its picturesqueness, and Mrs. Guérin is delighted. Please remember me to every body and with my many good wishes and greetings to you

Sincerely

Jules Guérin

 

Jules Guérin to Edward H. Bennett Correspondence, 05/14/1909

New York May 14-1909

Dear Edward:

At last the [unknown] has returned, and mighty glad to be again in Little Old New York. The latter part of my trip was most arduous, and trying: enjoyable, withall, and I have all sorts of interesting things to relate, and I hope that we may meet before many weeks. Of course, I painted a great deal of stuff: hope it will prove good. Do not honestly know now: about six months house, looking at the sketches, will be able to judge better. You [unknown] greatly interested in the Mosques of the East: [unknown], Cairo, and Jerusalem, and all through the Italy hand. Hope to show you the sketches. And now about generally. Your letter came to me in Naples, before sailing. Mighty glad to have it, and to know you were in the best condition. And tell me, what interesting problem have you on hand now? There must be something. And how is the expert getting along. You know, you are to send me a copy: hope you will do so. The Players, 16 Gramercy Park, always reaches me. Suppose you and Frank Junkin are still as sporty as ever. Please remember me to him most kindly, and when I come again, we can have several of those nice “[unknown]” evenings again. Bully place, that, and my thoughts often go back there, and the many pleasant evenings there. Are you coming up here this summer? I shall remain here all season, as far as I know. Have rented a studio until Sept, when my new home, in Gramercy Park, will be finished. Remember me to all the boys, and please extend my greetings to Mr. Burnham, and let me have a line from you.

Sincerely,

Jules Guérin

 

Jules Guérin to Edward H. Bennett Correspondence, 07/05/1909

July 5, 1909

Dear Edward:

Only yesterday I learned indirectly of the Governor’s illness, to my deepest sorrow. I sincerely trust it is not as severe as represented to me, and I wish you would write and tell me all about it. And convey to Mr. Burnham my heartfelt sorrow and my most sincere wishes that he will mend shortly, and return to his old condition. And let me know how matters are progressing with the Report: am most anxious to know. I’m working like a [unknown], as usual. My Fifth of July, today, was short in tail, but did manage to go to Short Hills yesterday, Sunday, for a little rest. And for a little news, I have been engaged to design the scenery and accessories for the opening production of the New Theatre. You have no doubt read about it. It is as near to a National Theater as we shall ever [unknown]. Rightly good thing for me, and I am enjoying the work tremendously. I will not paint the scenery: only design it. Nothing in the world would ever get me on the Paint Bridge again. Wish I could tell you the name of the piece, but it is forbidden, and I must be a dutiful child. The only thing I can say is that it is Shakespearian and a perfectly [unknown] opportunity. Let me know what you are doing, and regards to all, and do not [unknown] old bald headed Frank.

Sincerely,

Jules Guérin

 

Jules Guérin to Edward H. Bennett Correspondence, 10/21/1909

New York. Oct. 21-1909

My Dear Edward:

As gourmand is fore-owned, I dedicate these humble characters to announce to you that in the early part of the coming week you will again have the great satisfaction of [unknown] the dome of my intelligence, with the high-light properly placed. And will you please be so kind to ask your house-keeper to hold all letters addressed to me. A bientot my cher Edward

Sincerement

Jules Guérin

24 Gramercy Park

 

Jules Guérin to Edward H. Bennett Correspondence, 06/08/1910

New York. June 8-1910

My Dear Edward:

Your letter was received a week past with much pleasure, and should have answered before, but have been so infernally busy. The same old story: every body wants every thing all at once: consequently “nobody gets nothing” and there you are. Howard came in to see me when he landed: suppose he has arrived long ago in Chicago: also they [unknown] have informed you of my latest very good commission, the decoration of the new Penn. Station, in New York. A mighty good commission for an old house, and which not just exactly what I would WORD to do, it will surely hold my attention for a time. There are six [unknown] each 24x70 feet. Will paint large topographical landscapes, showing a vast extent of country, and WORD is a great deal as the frontispiece in the Chicago Report, looking down on Lake Michigan, only not so realistic. Am [unknown] feel long: 2 inches to the foot. So you see the sketches are something in size: wish you could see them, and give me a few words of your very good advice. Shall make the color so unimportant as possible, then the spectators will not be impressed immediately, but gradually see them: in other words, they will be part of the wall. Am I right, mon cher maitre. But this will not prevent my coming out to Chicago during the summer some time and I will get you and Andy to scare up a drawing for me, first for an [unknown]. It is dreadfully cold here: went out to dinner last evening and wore a winter over coat. Mighty glad Minneapolis is on the list, but you did not tell me anything about it: do so. About “The Hill of Golgotha,” is this not the one called “The Garden of Gethsemane,” and of course I would be delighted for you to have it, more so than any one. Ordinarily I would charge $250 and if you think you can afford $150 and pay for it any time as is convenient to you. You are quite welcome and it would give me great pleasure. Please remind me to all and all kinds of good wishes to you, and with you and let me know about the Garden.

Sincerely

Jules Guérin

 

Jules Guérin to Edward H. Bennett Correspondence, 06/24/1910

June 24-1910

My Dear Edward:

Andy telephoned to me yesterday, and he dines at my house this evening, and we will have the evening together, and perhaps come over here to the club. Ordinarily we might go to a Roof Garden, but my eyes are not in the best condition, consequently, I have rather eschewed shows of late. Today it is quite cool, but yesterday and the day before were simply unbearable: and you know how dreadful New York can be under certain conditions.

Regarding the picture, “Jerusalem and the Mount of Olives”: I will be very glad to have you [unknown] it, and now I will have to ask you if it will be convenient to deliver it about Jan. 1 next and for this reason: my contract with the [unknown] Co. allows them to have possession of all original pictures for a period of six months after publication, and I am obliged to sell under these conditions, and hope this will be satisfactory to you: and of course, you are not to send a check until the picture is delivered. I’m sorry this is the condition, but feel confident you will understand, and if this arrangement is satisfactory, let me have word, and I will reserve it for you. Before delivering any of the [unknown] and pictures, a number of which are sold, I want to exhibit them here in N.Y. This we have talked about before: and the date is already arranged: the latter part of Nov. so that sold pictures may be delivered for Christmas. Au revoir, a present, and let me have a line from you very soon.

Sincerely

Jules Guérin

 

Jules Guérin to Edward H. Bennett Correspondence, 11/01/1910

New York. Nov. 1-1910

Dear Edward:

Enclosed please find catalogue of the show, which opens tomorrow, thought you would be interested, and only wish you could see Exhibition. And when the show is over, kindly me where you want your pictures sent: to the Railway Exchange, or to your club, and I can leave order now with the packers. Would like to see your smiling face, and Andy’s too: and the old town, make a WORD for me and I will come out for a few days. Received yesterday a delightful letter from [unknown], London, and I rather imagine he will [unknown] up here in New York before many weeks. How is your work going, and you must write and tell me all about it, and what is in prospect. [Unknown] my greetings to all, yourself and all good wishes to you.

Sincerely

Jules Guérin

 

Jules Guérin to Edward H. Bennett Correspondence, 07/12/1912

New York. July-12-12

Dear Edward:

A few lines to tell you that yesterday we closed for my [unknown] at the Pan. Pac. Ex. as Director of color, and of course I am very glad of it. It had been lingering so long it was really beginning to get on my nerves. But I suppose Killan will have told you, or you will have learned from some other source long before this reaches you. So I believe, about it the 8 of August, I will again see your smiling face. Feeling fine, except some rheumatism in my ankles, occasionally am obliged to rely on a cane. Andy arrived last Sunday in N.Y. I did not see him, as I was in the country, [unknown] Hills. Billy Rennick has given me his house and servants for the summer, and as it is only about 45 minutes from Broadway, it is easy of access. Mrs. Guérin and my mother are there, and I go to them week-ends, which means a little relief from the stifling heat we are having. Business is very dull here. There is no news, beyond what I have written. Good Luck.

Sincerely

Jules Guérin

Colleagues
Jules Guérin